top of page

Tea Manufacturing

Updated: Dec 22, 2022


Tea Manufacturing
Tea Manufacturing

Few things are more refreshing than a cup of tea on a hot summer day. But have you ever wondered how that tea made its way from the plant to your cup? Today, we're going to take a look at the process of tea manufacturing, from start to finish.


There are two types of tea manufacturing

  1. Traditional Tea Manufacturing

  2. CTC Manufacturing


Traditional Tea Manufacturing


Process

The traditional tea manufacturing process has been used for centuries to produce some of the world's finest teas. Though the methods have changed and improved over time, the basic principles remain the same.


Harvesting

The process begins with harvesting the leaves from the Camellia Sinensis plant. The best quality teas are made with young leaves that are hand-picked and carefully sorted. Once the leaves have been collected, they are withered to remove excess moisture.


Rolling & Oxidation

After withering, the leaves are rolled to break down the cell walls and release their flavorful oils. The rolling process also shapes the leaves into uniform strips. Depending on the type of tea being produced, the rolled leaves may be left to oxidise or they may be immediately heated to stop the oxidation process.


Drying

Finally, the leaves are dried to remove any remaining moisture and preserve their flavour. The dried leaves are then ready to be packaged and sold.


The traditional tea manufacturing process is still used today to produce some of the finest teas in the world. Though modern methods have improved and streamlined the process, the basic principles remain the same.


CTC Tea Manufacturing


The CTC (Crush, Tear, Curl) manufacturing process is a method of processing black tea in which the tea leaves are passed through a series of cylindrical rollers that crush, tear, and curl them.


This method was first developed in Assam, Bangladesh in the 1930s as a way to speed up the production of black tea. The CTC method yields a higher proportion of fannings and dust, which are used in lower grade teabags. The finished product quality depends on various factors, such as the quality of raw materials used, weather conditions during manufacture and storage, etc.


The CTC manufacturing process involves four main steps: withering, rolling, fermentation and drying.


Withering

Withering is the first step in the CTC manufacturing process. Freshly plucked tea leaves are withered in large trays or on conveyor belts to reduce their moisture content. Withering softens the tea leaves and makes them pliable for further processing.


Rolling

Rolling is the second step in the CTC manufacturing process. Rolled tea undergoes a series of crushing and tearing action which gives it a distinctive shape. The rolled tea is then passed through a series of sieves to break it into smaller pieces.


Fermentation

Fermentation is the third step in the CTC manufacturing process. Fermentation develops the colour and flavour of the tea. Tea leaves are spread out in long, shallow fermenting troughs where they undergo a controlled fermentation process.


Drying

Drying is the fourth and final step in the CTC manufacturing process. Drying removes the remaining moisture from the tea leaves and prevents further fermentation. The dried tea leaves are then graded and sorted according to their size and quality.


The entire process from plucking to sorting can take anywhere from a few hours to several weeks, depending on the type of tea being produced. But no matter what type of tea you're enjoying, it all started with some simple leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant!


Different types of Tea manufacturing


Did you know that, All the teas are made from one plant, Camellia sinensis, but Depending on the type of tea being produced, the manufacturing process can vary slightly? let's take a look at how black tea, green tea, and oolong tea are made.


Black Tea

Black tea is made from leaves that have been allowed to oxidize, or turn brown. The oxidation process is what gives black tea its characteristic color and flavor. To oxidation to occur, the freshly picked leaves are first withered to remove excess moisture. Next, they are rolled to break down the cell walls and release the enzymes that will cause oxidation. Finally, they are dried to stop the oxidation process.


Green Tea

Green tea leaves are not allowed to oxidize like black tea leaves are. Instead, they are heated soon after being picked in order to stop the oxidation process. The heating process can be done in one of two ways: by steaming or by pan-firing. After the leaves have been heated, they are rolled and dried like black tea leaves.


Oolong Tea

Oolong tea falls somewhere between black and green tea in terms of oxidation; it is partially oxidized. Oolong teas can be very different from one another depending on how long they are allowed to oxidize before being heated. The manufacturing process for oolong tea begins in much the same way as it does for green tea: the freshly picked leaves are withered and then heated to stop the oxidation process. However, after they are heated, they are rolled multiple times and left to sit so that partial oxidation can occur. Once the desired level of oxidation has been reached, the leaves are dried once again to stop the oxidation process completely.



As you can see, there is a lot that goes into making tea! The next time you enjoy a cup of your favorite brew, take a moment to think about all of the hard work that went into bringing it to your cup. From picking the leaves to rolling them just so, every step in the manufacturing process is crucial in determining what kind of final product we will enjoy.



Kommentare


bottom of page