top of page

Tea Lovers, Unite!


Tea Lovers, Unite!
Tea Lovers, Unite!


We all know that tea is one of the world’s most beloved drinks. But who loves it the most? Is it the British, who are renowned for their afternoon tea time rituals? Or perhaps it’s China, where tea has been enjoyed for thousands of years? Or Sri Lanka for its quality tea? Let’s take a look at all three cultures and find out who loves tea more.



The British Love of Tea

Tea has been a part of British culture since 1662 when Catherine of Braganza brought her love of the beverage to London when she married Charles II. It quickly spread across the country, becoming especially popular amongst upper-class society. The tradition of afternoon tea was born in 1840 with Anna Russell, Duchess of Bedford. Over time, different types of teas became associated with different classes—so much so that even today you can still see hints of class structure in which type of tea is being served.


The Chinese Love Of Tea

In comparison to Britain, China has had a much longer history with its love affair with tea. The earliest known records documenting its use date back over 4,000 years ago during the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD). During this period, drinking tea became an integral part of Chinese culture. Drinking it was considered beneficial for health and longevity as well as being an important social activity—with some even using it as a form of meditation. Traditional Chinese teas such as green and oolong are still incredibly popular today both within China and around the world.


The Sri Lankan Love of Tea

Finally, let’s not forget the Sri Lankan love of tea. The island nation is renowned for its Ceylon Tea—named after the original name of Sri Lanka. During the 19th century, British traders introduced tea to Sri Lanka and it quickly became a hit amongst locals. Nowadays, there are numerous tea plantations across Sri Lanka producing high-quality teas that have also gained widespread popularity beyond the island.



So who loves tea more? It's a difficult question to answer as cultures around the world have different levels of appreciation for this wonderful beverage. Whether it's Britain with its afternoon tea traditions or China with its long history of drinking tea – each culture has something unique to offer when it comes to enjoying this beloved drink. Sri Lanka too, cannot be forgotten as it plays an important role in the modern-day tea industry. With so many teas available and so much love for them, we can all come together and appreciate the wonderful beverage that is tea! Ultimately though, we can all agree that no matter how you take your cuppa—it's always best shared with friends!



Comments


bottom of page